As we can see, these scales are almost identical except for one interval, the Augmented fourth in the F Lydian mode. This note is what I called before “the characteristic note” of that particular mode, the note that gives the F Lydian mode its peculiar sound — its “Lydian-ness” — and the one that differentiates it from sounding like a major scale.

This is music that hits you right between the eyes! There’s no messing around. Hailing from the gloriously creative shores of Iceland, where seemingly everyone is an incredible composer or artist of some sort, Anna Thorvaldsdottir (or Þorvaldsdóttir) is an award-winning composer who music is informed as much by sounds and nuances as by harmonies, tones, and lyrical material. What can be thought of as an ecosystem of sounds and materials, Thorvaldsottir’s music is mesmerizing and powerful, taking much of its inspiration from landscape and nature. Thorvaldsdottir’s dark and complex music continues to gain more and more acclaim and rightfully so!

This mentored online course is the brainchild of composer, educator, and cultural diplomat Charles Burchell, and provides a deep, well-rounded understanding of the subtleties of hip-hop beat production. We cover areas of producing hip-hop such as: writing beats and bass lines from scratch, creative sampling techniques, arranging and songwriting, mixing, and more, with a specific eye to hip-hop’s many subgenres.

80 hip hop groups

How much does the general public really pay attention to bass riffs? I’m not talking about songs in which the bass has the main hook, like Queen’s “Another One Bites the Dust” or Lou Reed’s “Walk on the Wild Side” where the bass is technically the lead instrument, nor am I talking about every disco hit ever. How much do people really take the time to hear through what’s going on in the rest of the mix to find what the bass is doing?

(If you find yourself lost in all the music theory below, check out our free series of courses, Theory for Producers, and catch up on the fundamentals, even if you can’t read sheet music!)

“I Want It That Way” was the epitome of boy-band ballads, the high-water mark of a guilty-pleasure genre that everyone, eventually, grows out of. The amount of times I’ve seen gaggles of people singing this at karaoke is astounding. Every word’s been ingrained in my head. Today, our teenagers listen and do their best to sing along to a Korean pop boy-band, which kind of begs a lot of questions about whether we really need to grow out of anything? Let alone understand it…

Filippo Faustini is a guitarist and producer based in London. He graduated in Modern Guitar at the Conservatoire in Frosinone (Italy) and then he completed an MA in Composition for Moving Images at City University (London). He is the guitarist and producer for the London-based alt rock/ambient band, Alice in the Cruel Sea. Filippo is also the co-founder of a recently formed music production company called Music Brewery where he works as producer and mixing engineer. 

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2000s hip hop artists

Banker: Um. Okay. Do you have any proof of income?

When I was first asked to analyze a pop tune, I felt it was my Canadian duty to avoid Justin Bieber’s tune “Sorry” (which a real Canadian would have pronounced “SORE-ee” rather than “SAW-ree”). However, I live with a semi-secret Belieber, so the song was hard to avoid, and it turns out there’s actually something pretty harmonically hip going on under Justin’s dulcet tones.

What does this mean? It means I’m going with my first instinct: D♭ Lydian, mainly because it’s just, like, in my feelings. But you could also say it’s E♭ Mixolydian if you’re enamored with the strong beat chord, or go back to A♭ major too because of the melodies. Or, why not classify this one as multimodal?

It’s the melodic hook of the song and the real star of this show. At the same time, it follows standard rules for writing a good melody — it has a balance of stepwise motion and leaps, and stays within a comfortable singing range (in this case, less than two octaves). Great bass lines should be singable!

NBS uses a variety of data gathering processes to determine these metrics, but they synthesize everything into handy charts and models so you can better understand your fanbase in real time. This includes data from your Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter pages, YouTube/Vevo views and activity, Pandora spins and references, and more.